May 27, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Nasolacrimal duct obstruction presents with tearing and mucoid discharge from the affected eye. Signs and symptoms include tearing (epiphora), mucoid discharge especially in the morning, erythema of one or both lids and conjunctivitis.

May 26, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Horner syndrome, which may be congenital or acquired, presents with signs of unequal pupils (anisocoria), eyelid ptosis, iris heterochromia and anhidrosis. The syndrome is caused by an abnormality or lesion to the sympathetic chain.

May 25, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Blunt trauma to the orbit may result in orbit fractures. The orbital floor is a common location for a fracture (called a blowout fracture). A specific fracture that occurs mainly in children after blunt orbit trauma is called the white-eyed blowout fracture.

May 24, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Pink to red, oval plaques with fine scales that tend to align with their long axis parallel to skin tension lines (“Christmas tree pattern” on the back) are characteristic lesions of pityriasis rosea.

May 23, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Inflammatory papules and pustules with occasional comedones predominantly on the face occur in as many as 20% of newborns. Although neonatal acne can be present at birth, it most often occurs between 2 and 4 weeks of age.

May 22, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Milia are tiny epidermal cysts filled with keratinous material. These 1-2 mm white papules occur predominantly on the face in 40% of newborns. Their intraoral counterparts are called Epstein pearls and occur in up to 60-85% of neonates.

May 21, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
End-tidal CO (ETCO) monitoring provides continuous means of assessing the adequacy of ventilation. The ETCO level closely approximates the alveolar CO level (PaCO), which should equal the arterial CO level (PaCO).

May 20, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
The most common type of shock in the pediatric population is hypovolemia. Frequent causes include dehydration, diabetes, heat illness, hemorrhage and burns. Isotonic crystalloid is given as initial therapy in shock.

#CarChronicles | Too Old To Get Into Nursing?

May 19, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
IV access is essential but can be difficult to establish in children with shock. Peripheral access, especially via the antecubital veins, should be attempted first, but central cannulation should follow quickly if peripheral access is unsuccessful.

May 18, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
The pertussis component of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTP) vaccines contains whole-cell pertussis antigens and has been replaced with DTaP vaccines, which contain acellular, inactivated pertussis components.

May 17, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
Somatoform disorders are defined by the presence of physical illness or disability for which no organic cause can be identified, although neither the patient nor the caregiver is consciously fabricating the symptoms.

May 16, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
The typical child with conduct disorder is a boy with a turbulent home life and academic difficulties. Defiance of authority, fighting, tantrums, running away, school failure and destruction of property are common symptoms.

May 15, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
As patients with anorexia nervosa become malnourished, the fat pad between the superior mesenteric artery and the duodenum shrinks and compression of the transverse duodenum may cause obstruction and vomiting.

May 14, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Anorexia nervosa causes amenorrhea. The hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis shuts down under stress, causing hypothalamic amenorrhea. Amenorrhea is a clinical sign of malnourishment.

May 13, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
There are two forms of anorexia nervosa. In the restricting type, patients do not regularly engage in binge eating or purging. In the binge-purge type, anorexia nervosa is combined with binge eating or purging behavior, or both.

May 12, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Bath salts have a main ingredient of 4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone, a central nervous stimulant that inhibits norepinephrine-dopaminergic reuptake. The effects of this substance is similar to those of stimulants like PCP, ecstasy and LSD.

May 11, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Mittelschmerz is midcycle discomfort resulting from ovulation. The cause of the pain is unknown but irritation of the peritoneum due to spillage of fluid from the ruptured follicular cyst at the time of ovulation has been suggested.

May 10, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Primary amenorrhea is defined as having no menstrual periods or secondary sex characteristics by age 13 years or no menses in the presence of secondary sex characteristics by age 15 years.

May 9, 2016

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
In gastroschisis, the uncovered intestine extrudes through a small abdominal wall defect to the right of the umbilical cord. There is no membrane or sac and no liver or spleen outside the abdomen. Gastroschisis is associated with intestinal atresia.