August 30, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
IV drugs should be injected slowly (over 1 minute or more). Because all of the blood in the body is circulated once every minute, by injecting a drug over a full 1 minute interval, we cause it to be diluted in the largest volume of blood possible.

August 29, 2014

Bedside Nursing Documentation Sheet | Surgical Page

Printable PDF Version
Nursing Documentation To Organize Your Day
Created By | Unknown

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
When a drug is administered IV, there are no barriers to absorption. Absorption is the movement of a drug from its site of administration into the blood. Since IV administration puts a drug directly into the blood, all barriers are bypassed.

August 28, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
A PRN medication order is one in which the nurse has discretion regarding how much drug to give and when to give it. PRN stands for pro re nata, a Latin phrase meaning as needed or as the occasion arises.

August 27, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
An effective drug is one that elicits the responses for which it is given. Effectiveness is the most important property a drug can have. Regardless of its other virtues, if a drug is not effective, there is no justification for giving it.

August 26, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Cardiac electrical activity begins in the sinoatrial node and continues until the entire heart is activated. Each cell becomes activated in turn and the impulse dies out when all fibers have been discharged and are completely refractory.

August 25, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Conduction delay and block can result in arrhythmias. Bradyarrhythmias occur when impulses block and are followed by asystole or an escape rhythm. Tachyarrhythmias occur when the delay and block produce reentrant excitation.

August 24, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Patients with the heritable long-QT syndrome have abnormally prolonged cardiac action potential duration and are at increased risk for sudden cardiac death from ventricular tachyarrhythmias.

August 23, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
The cardiac transmembrane action potential consists of five phases: phase 0 - rapid depolarization; phase 1 - rapid repolarization; phase 2 - plateau; phase 3 - final repolarization and phase 4 - resting potential and diastolic depolarization.

August 22, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Electrical signaling in the heart involves the passage of ions. The Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Cl- ions are the major carriers. Their movement across the cell membrane creates a flow of current that generates excitation and signals in cardiac myocytes.

August 21, 2014

#AskNacole | You Had A Medication Error, Now What?

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
The sinoatrial node is a spindle-shaped structure composed of a fibrous tissue matrix with closely packed cells. It is 10 to 20 mm long, 2 to 3 mm wide and thick, tending to narrow caudally toward the inferior vena cava.

August 20, 2014

#AskNacole | Inappropriate GN Assignments

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
A mechanical circulatory support pump may be positioned extracorporeally or intracorporeally as a biventricular assist device (BiVAD), a right ventricular assist device (RVAD), or more commonly a left ventricular assist device (LVAD).

August 19, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Cardiac glycosides increase the velocity and extent of shortening of cardiac muscle, thereby resulting in an upward and leftward shift of the ventricular function curve relating cardiac performance to filling volume or pressure.

August 18, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
The adverse effects of digoxin are as follows: (1) cardiac arrhythmias such as heart block; (2) neurologic complaints such as visual disturbances and disorientation; (3) gastrointestinal symptoms such as anorexia and nausea.

August 17, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Digoxin exerts its effects by inhibiting the Na+,K+-ATPase pump in cell membranes. Inhibition of the Na+,K+-ATPase pump leads to an increase in intracellular calcium and hence increased cardiac contractility.

August 16, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Beta blocker therapy represents a major advance in the treatment of heart failure patients with a low EF. Beta blockers interfere with the harmful effects of sustained activation of the nervous system by antagonizing adrenergic receptors.

August 15, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Both ACEIs and ARBs have similar effects on blood pressure, renal function and potassium levels. Therefore, the problems of symptomatic hypotension, azotemia and hyperkalemia will be similar for both these agents.

August 14, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Although ACEIs and ARBs inhibit RAS, they do so by different mechanisms. ACEIs block the enzyme responsible for converting angiotensin I to angiotensin II, whereas ARBs block the effects of angiotensin II on the angiotensin type 1 receptor.