June 13, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
Generalized anxiety disorder is defined as excessive worry that occurs most days over a 6-month period involving several events or activities. The anxiety must cause significant distress or impairment in functioning.

June 12, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
A panic attack is not a diagnosis but rather an indication of an underlying disorder. The presence of panic attacks often influences the treatment and outcome of the primary illness. An attack can be replicated by intentional hyperventilation.

June 11, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
A panic attack is an abrupt fear or discomfort that reaches a peak within minutes and has associated physical and cognitive symptoms. It may occur with any anxiety disorder or as part of another mental or physical disorder.

June 10, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
The atypical antipsychotic medicines including ziprasidone, risperidone, olanzapine, aripiprazole and quetiapine, cause fewer side effects (such as, acute dystonia) than conventional antipsychotic agents.

June 9, 2019

Metacognition & Learning | Nursing Hacks # 14


Metacognition is a concept that concentrates on thinking about your thinking. Seems confusing, I know, but it focuses on processes concerning monitoring, assesses, and evaluating your understanding and performance. Metacognition is a new trend in nursing school education, and I'm very excited to see it is finally being put to use. It goes beyond nursing concepts and focuses on the learner's actual ability to learn and comprehend content. As an individual either interested or currently in the nursing profession, I know that metacognition will improve your knowledge capabilities. Metacognition makes you aware of your strengths and weaknesses in a variety of topics. It provides the learner the ability to be proactive, and not solely reactive to the learning process. The fundamental component of metacognition is the recognition of one's limitations regarding knowledge and performance. Once the deficiencies are known, one can focus on filling those gaps and expanding knowledge and performance roots. You don't know what you don't know unless you explore your perspectives toward learning. As humans, we tend to be blissfully oblivious of our incompetence, and lack insight about our deficiencies. We are our perspective, and every encounter is viewed through our own lens. To allow true education to take place, we must asses our viewpoint towards educational fundamentals. In order to understand the disease process of COPD, you must first understand the concept of gas exchange. Knowing the symptoms is not learning, it is memorization and unhelpful. Hence nursing schools moving toward nursing concept learning models.

 What can we do about this?

# 1: Examine Current Thinking
- What are your current feelings or ideas about the topic?
- What experiences have influenced your opinion about the topic?
- What are you learning & why are you learning it?

# 2: Identifying Confusion
- What element is confusing to you?
- What are you having issues grasping?
- What foundations do you feel you are lacking?

... research the gaps found, educate & evolve your thinking ... 

# 3: Recognize Change
- How has your thinking changed?
- What concrete concepts remained?

# 4: Reflection
- Do you feel you have expanded your knowledge?
- What gaps remain? What other questions do you have?

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
Patients presenting with mood disorder symptomology are frequently in crisis, often overwhelmed and frankly scared. The ED is a chaotic, stimulating environment that may cause or exacerbate the patients’ level of agitation.

June 8, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
Borderline personality disorder is characterized by unstable personal relationships, unstable self-image, and self-destructive behaviors. These patients typically live lives of crisis and constant conflict.

June 7, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
Adjustment disorders are behavioral or emotional disorders that occur in response to an identifiable stress or stressors, with marked distress that is out of proportion to the severity of the stressor.

June 6, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
Manic patients have decreased or no need for sleep and typically report being awake for days. They may be involved in a massive project and may completely disregard consequences of actions.

June 5, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
In many cases, manic patients are brought to the ED by someone else. Patients who are experiencing a manic episode may present as gregarious, humorous, and engaging, which may suddenly alternate with belligerence and irritability.

June 4, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
Postpartum mood episodes with psychotic features can be particularly dangerous. Infanticide is most often associated with command hallucinations to kill the infant or associated delusions.

June 3, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
Postpartum depression is a depressive disorder that occurs during or within 4 weeks of delivery and would allow for the specifier “with peripartum onset.” Symptoms of depression are common in the perinatal period.

June 2, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
Depression is more common in elders because of more frequent occurrences of loss, comorbid health issues, and loss of autonomy. The elderly have a tendency to report more somatic complaints when depressed.

June 1, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
Patients in a depressed episode are at increased risk for suicide. Suicidal thoughts may range from vague notions that life is not worth living (passive) to fully envisioned suicide plans with definitive intent to kill themselves (active).

May 31, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Psychiatric Nursing

Category: Psychiatric Nursing 
Depressed patients may complain of insomnia or hypersomnia. Insomnia may be manifested as difficulty in falling asleep or awakenings throughout the night. Depressed patients with hypersomnia may report sleeping 12 to 14 hours a day.