August 28, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Gardasil is a quadrivalent vaccine. Cervarix is bivalent. Gardasil protects against cervical, vulvar, anal and vaginal cancer, as well as genital warts. By contrast, Cervarix only protects against cervical cancer.

August 27, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Immunization with the hepatitis A vaccine (HepA) decreases the risk of clinical disease by 94% to 100%. Protective levels of antibodies are seen in 94% to 100% of adults and children 1 month after the first dose.

August 26, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) contains hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), the primary antigenic protein in the viral envelope. Administration of HepB promotes synthesis of specific antibodies directed against hepatitis B virus.

August 25, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Varicella vaccine is contraindicated for pregnant women, individuals with certain cancers (leukemia, lymphomas) and individuals with hypersensitivity to neomycin or gelatin, both of which are in the vaccine.

August 24, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate (Hib) vaccine is among the safest of all vaccines. Serious adverse effects have not been reported. The few adverse effects that do occur are generally transient and mild.

August 23, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Immunization with DTaP reduces the risk of disease by 80% to 90%. Protection begins after the third dose and persists 4 to 6 years (against pertussis) and 10 years (against diphtheria and tetanus).

August 22, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Primary vaccination against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis is usually done simultaneously using a combination product, composed of diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP).

August 21, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
MMR is administered subcutaneously into the outer aspect of the upper arm. Each child should receive two vaccinations, the first between 12 and 15 months of age, and the second between 4 and 6 years.

August 20, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Products that contain immune globulins (whole blood, serum, specific immune globulins) contain antibodies against the viruses in MMR and therefore can inhibit the immune response to the vaccine.

August 19, 2015

#CarChronicles | Giving Bad News & Body Fluids

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
MMR is contraindicated during pregnancy and should be used with caution in children with a history of (1) thrombocytopenia or thrombocytopenic purpura or (2) anaphylactic-like reactions to gelatin, eggs or neomycin.

August 18, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, is a combination product composed of three live virus vaccines. Administration induces synthesis of antibodies directed against measles, mumps and rubella viruses.

August 17, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Around 100 types of human papillomavirus (HPV) are known to exist. About 95% of genital warts are caused by HPV-6 and HPV-11. About 70% of cervical cancers are caused by two other types, known as HPV-16 and HPV-18.

August 16, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Rotavirus, which infects the intestinal mucosa, is the most common diarrheal pathogen. Infection presents initially as upset stomach and vomiting, usually with fever and then progresses to several days of diarrhea, which can be mild to severe. 

August 15, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Meningococcal infection is transmitted through direct contact with respiratory secretions. Injury results from a meningococcal endotoxin, which is produced so quickly that death can result within hours of infection onset.

August 14, 2015

#CarChronicles | Rude Folks & Contracts

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading bacterial cause of childhood meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia and otitis media. Among children with pneumococcal meningitis, up to 50% suffer permanent brain damage or hearing loss.

August 13, 2015

#CarChronicles | Nurse Practitioner School Update

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Varicella (chickenpox) is a common and highly contagious disease of childhood. The causative organism is varicella-zoster virus, a member of the herpesvirus group. Patients typically develop 250 to 500 maculopapular or vesicular lesions.

August 12, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Haemophilus influenzae type b is a gram-negative bacterium that can cause meningitis, pneumonia and serious throat and ear infections. The bacterium is the leading cause of serious illness in children under the age of 5 years.