May 29, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Excessive secretion of prolactin produces adverse effects in males and females. Women may experience amenorrhea, galactorrhea (excessive milk flow) and infertility. In men, libido and potency are reduced, galactorrhea occurs on occasion.

May 28, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Prolactin is a polypeptide hormone produced by the anterior pituitary. The principal function of prolactin is stimulation of milk production after parturition. Prolactin deficiency is generally without symptoms, except for disturbance of lactation.

May 27, 2015

#AskNacole | What It Really Takes To Be A Good Nurse

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a complex genetic disorder characterized by short stature, mental impairment, incomplete sexual development, behavior problems, low muscle tone and the urge to eat constantly, which promotes obesity.

May 26, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Treatment of gigantism requires surgical removal of the pituitary. In contrast, acromegaly may be treated with three modalities: surgery, radiation or drugs. Surgical excision of the pituitary adenoma is the preferred initial treatment.

May 25, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
When GH excess occurs in children, it is called gigantism and when the excess occurs in adults, it is called acromegaly. The pathophysiology of both is similar. The difference depends on epiphyses development and it's ability to be stimulated.



May 24, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Growth hormone (GH) reduces glucose utilization. When GH is administered to patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin cannot be released. As a result, the hyperglycemic action of GH goes unopposed, allowing glucose levels to rise.

May 23, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Growth hormone (GH) is a large polypeptide hormone (191 amino acids) produced by the anterior pituitary. As its name suggests, GH helps regulate growth. Deficiency of GH results in short stature. Excessive GH results in gigantism and acromegaly.

May 22, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
The posterior pituitary has only two hormones: oxytocin and antidiuretic hormone (ADH). The principal function of oxytocin is to facilitate uterine contractions at term. ADH promotes renal conservation of water.

May 21, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
The anterior pituitary produces six hormones: the growth hormone (GH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and prolactin.

May 20, 2015

#AskNacole | Nursing Oversaturation Discussion

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
The pituitary sits in a depression in the skull located just below the third ventricle of the brain. The pituitary has two divisions: the anterior pituitary (or adenohypophysis) and posterior pituitary (or neurohypophysis).

May 19, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Levothyroxine has a narrow therapeutic range. In order to maintain good control, all pills must produce the same levothyroxine levels. If a patient switches from one product to another, the new product must be bioequivalent to the old one.

May 18, 2015

Product Review | Infinity By Cherokee, WonderWink WonderWORK & Jaanuu

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Thyroid hormones increase cardiac responsiveness to catecholamines, thereby increasing the risk of catecholamine-induced dysrhythmias. Caution must be exercised when administering catecholamines to patients receiving levothyroxine.

May 17, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Levothyroxine is indicated for all forms of hypothyroidism, regardless of cause. The drug is used for cretinism, myxedema coma, simple goiter, insufficient TSH, insufficient TRH and primary hypothyroidism in adults and children. 

May 16, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Levothyroxine is highly protein bound (about 99.97%), with a prolonged half-life (about 7 days). Though the hormone levels remain steady, it takes about 1 month (four half-lives) for plasma levels of levothyroxine to reach plateau.

May 15, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Absorption of oral levothyroxine is reduced by food. To minimize variability in blood levels, levothyroxine should be taken on an empty stomach in the morning, at least 30 to 60 minutes before breakfast.

May 14, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Thyrotoxic crisis can be life threatening and requires immediate treatment. High doses of potassium iodide or strong iodine solution are given to suppress thyroid hormone release. Propylthiouracil is given to suppress thyroid hormone synthesis.

May 13, 2015

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Thyrotoxic crisis can occur in patients with severe thyrotoxicosis when they undergo major surgery or develop a severe illness (infection, sepsis). The syndrome is characterized by profound hyperthermia, tachycardia, restlessness and tremor.