November 20, 2014

YouTube Vlog | Nursing Reality TV (What Nurses Deal With)

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Etomidate (Amidate) is a potent hypnotic agent used for induction of surgical anesthesia. Unconsciousness develops rapidly and lasts about 5 minutes. The drug has no analgesic actions. Cardiovascular effects are less than with barbiturates.

November 19, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
The appeal of propofol is unique. Clinicians don't use the drug to produce a “high.” Rather, they use it to produce instantaneous (but brief) sleep, after which individuals wake up reporting feeling refreshed, elated and even euphoric.

November 18, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Rarely, prolonged, high-dose infusions of Propofol (Diprivan) lead to propofol infusion syndrome, characterized by metabolic acidosis, cardiac failure, renal failure and rhabdomyolysis. Deaths have occurred.

November 17, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Propofol (Diprivan) poses a high risk of bacterial infection. It is not water soluble and is formulated in a lipid-based medium, which is ideal for bacterial growth. Use of contaminated preparations after opening have caused sepsis and death.

November 16, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Propofol (Diprivan) can cause profound respiratory depression and hypotension. The drug has a relatively narrow therapeutic range and can cause death from respiratory arrest. With all patients, respiratory support should be available.

November 15, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Propofol (Diprivan) works by promoting release of GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The result is generalized CNS depression. Propofol has no analgesic actions, rapid onset and ultra short duration.

November 14, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Propofol (Diprivan) was approved in 1989 and is now our most widely used IV anesthetic. About 90% of patients who undergo anesthesia receive the drug. Propofol is indicated for induction and maintenance of general anesthesia.

November 13, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Midazolam (Versed) may be used for induction of anesthesia and to produce conscious sedation. When used for induction, midazolam is usually combined with a short-acting barbiturate. Unconsciousness develops in 80 seconds.

November 12, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Despite its low anesthetic potency, nitrous oxide is one of our most widely used inhalation agents. Many patients undergoing general anesthesia receive nitrous oxide to supplement the analgesic effects of the primary anesthetic.

November 11, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Nitrous oxide has low anesthetic potency, it is virtually impossible to produce surgical anesthesia effects. The MAC of nitrous oxide is greater than 100%. So even if 100% of nitrous oxide was given, it would not produce surgical anesthesia.

November 10, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Dexmedetomidine (Precedex) is a highly selective alpha-adrenergic agonist approved only for short-term sedation in critically ill patients. However, the drug is also used for other purposes, including enhancement of sedation during surgery.

November 9, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Depression of respiratory and cardiac function is a concern with virtually all inhalation anesthetics. Doses only 2-4 times greater than those needed for surgical anesthesia are sufficient to cause potentially lethal results.

November 8, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
A major determinant of anesthetic uptake is the concentration of anesthetic in the inspired air. Other factors that influence uptake are pulmonary ventilation, solubility of the anesthetic in blood and blood flow through the lungs.

November 7, 2014

#AskNacole | Bustle.com Response (Nursing Student Experiences)

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) is an index of inhalation anesthetic potency. The MAC is defined as the minimum concentration of drug in the alveolar air that will produce immobility in 50% of patients exposed to a painful stimulus.

November 6, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Muscle spasm is defined as involuntary contraction of a muscle or muscle group. Muscle spasm is often painful and reduces the ability to function. Spasm can result from epilepsy, hypocalcemia, acute and chronic pain syndromes, and trauma.

November 5, 2014

#AskNacole | Go Go Gadget Nursing Resources

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing
Cholinesterase inhibitors prevent the breakdown of ACh by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and increases the availability of ACh. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, the result is enhanced transmission by cholinergic neurons.

November 4, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
The cholinesterase inhibitors were the first drugs approved by the FDA to treat Alzheimer's disease. In clinical trials, these drugs produced modest improvements in cognition, behavior, function and slightly delayed disease progression.