November 28, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Furosemide can cause a substantial drop in blood pressure. At least two mechanisms are involved: (1) loss of volume and (2) relaxation of venous smooth muscle, which reduces venous return to the heart.

November 27, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Furosemide is especially useful in patients with severe renal impairment. Since unlike the thiazides, the drug can promote diuresis even when renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) are low.

November 26, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Furosemide can be administered PO, IV and IM. With oral administration, diuresis begins in 60 minutes and persists for 8 hours. Effects of intravenous furosemide begin within 5 minutes and last for 2 hours.

November 25, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Furosemide acts in the thick segment of the ascending limb of Henle's loop to block reabsorption of sodium and chloride. By blocking solute reabsorption, furosemide prevents passive reabsorption of water. 

November 24, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
The high-ceiling agents are the most effective diuretics available. These drugs produce more loss of fluid and electrolytes than any other diuretics. Because their site of action is in the loop of Henle, these agents are also known as loop diuretics.

November 23, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
The increase in urine flow that a diuretic produces is directly related to the amount of sodium and chloride reabsorption that it blocks. Accordingly, drugs that block solute reabsorption to the greatest degree produce the most profound diuresis. 

November 22, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Most diuretics share the same basic mechanism of action, blockade of sodium and chloride reabsorption. By blocking this reabsorption, diuretics create osmotic pressure within the nephron that prevents the passive reabsorption of water.

November 21, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Ketamine (Ketalar) produces a state known as dissociative anesthesia in which the patient feels dissociated from his or her environment. In addition, the drug causes sedation, immobility, analgesia and amnesia. Responsiveness to pain is lost.

November 20, 2014

YouTube Vlog | Nursing Reality TV (What Nurses Deal With)

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Etomidate (Amidate) is a potent hypnotic agent used for induction of surgical anesthesia. Unconsciousness develops rapidly and lasts about 5 minutes. The drug has no analgesic actions. Cardiovascular effects are less than with barbiturates.

November 19, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
The appeal of propofol is unique. Clinicians don't use the drug to produce a “high.” Rather, they use it to produce instantaneous (but brief) sleep, after which individuals wake up reporting feeling refreshed, elated and even euphoric.

November 18, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Rarely, prolonged, high-dose infusions of Propofol (Diprivan) lead to propofol infusion syndrome, characterized by metabolic acidosis, cardiac failure, renal failure and rhabdomyolysis. Deaths have occurred.

November 17, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Propofol (Diprivan) poses a high risk of bacterial infection. It is not water soluble and is formulated in a lipid-based medium, which is ideal for bacterial growth. Use of contaminated preparations after opening have caused sepsis and death.

November 16, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Propofol (Diprivan) can cause profound respiratory depression and hypotension. The drug has a relatively narrow therapeutic range and can cause death from respiratory arrest. With all patients, respiratory support should be available.

November 15, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Propofol (Diprivan) works by promoting release of GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The result is generalized CNS depression. Propofol has no analgesic actions, rapid onset and ultra short duration.

November 14, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Propofol (Diprivan) was approved in 1989 and is now our most widely used IV anesthetic. About 90% of patients who undergo anesthesia receive the drug. Propofol is indicated for induction and maintenance of general anesthesia.

November 13, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Midazolam (Versed) may be used for induction of anesthesia and to produce conscious sedation. When used for induction, midazolam is usually combined with a short-acting barbiturate. Unconsciousness develops in 80 seconds.

November 12, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Despite its low anesthetic potency, nitrous oxide is one of our most widely used inhalation agents. Many patients undergoing general anesthesia receive nitrous oxide to supplement the analgesic effects of the primary anesthetic.

November 11, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Nitrous oxide has low anesthetic potency, it is virtually impossible to produce surgical anesthesia effects. The MAC of nitrous oxide is greater than 100%. So even if 100% of nitrous oxide was given, it would not produce surgical anesthesia.

November 10, 2014

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Medical Surgical Nursing

Category: Medical Surgical Nursing 
Dexmedetomidine (Precedex) is a highly selective alpha-adrenergic agonist approved only for short-term sedation in critically ill patients. However, the drug is also used for other purposes, including enhancement of sedation during surgery.