February 18, 2018

The Working Nurse Podcast | S1, E3

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
The most common side effect seen with ketamine is the emergence phenomenon. The patient awakens with unpleasant vivid dreams or hallucinations or reports nighttime awakenings as a result of unpleasant dreams for several days.

February 17, 2018

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Ketamine has several advantages over other PSA agents. The most notable are its profound analgesic effect and lack of significant respiratory depression. The protective airway reflexes, such as coughing, swallowing and muscular tone of the tongue and pharynx, are preserved or slightly enhanced.

February 16, 2018

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Ketamine leads to profound analgesia, amnesia, and catalepsis. It does not produce unconsciousness, but rather a trancelike state. Patients often experience nystagmus, roving eye movements and random movements of the extremities.

February 15, 2018

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Benzodiazepines are potent amnestic, hypnotic and anxiolytic medications. They also have anticonvulsant and muscle relaxant properties but do not have analgesic effects. Midazolam is the most commonly used agent in critical care.

February 14, 2018

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Chest wall rigidity and glottic spasm are complications seen with high doses of fentanylThese adverse effects may be reversed by naloxone. Hypotension and bradycardia are rare but may also occur with high doses of fentanyl.

February 13, 2018

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Fentanyl produces analgesia in as little as 90 seconds. It has a duration of action of 30 to 40 minutes. The peak respiratory depressant effect of a single IV dose of fentanyl is 5 to 15 minutes following injection.

February 12, 2018

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
General anesthesia is a drug-induced loss of consciousness during which patients are not arousable. Positive-pressure ventilation may be required because of depressed spontaneous ventilation. Cardiovascular function may be impaired.

February 11, 2018

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Deep sedation and analgesia describes a drug-induced depression of consciousness in which patients can't be easily aroused but respond purposefully after painful stimulation. Patients may need assistance maintaining a patent airway.

February 10, 2018

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Dissociative sedation is a trancelike cataleptic state induced by ketamine. It is characterized by profound analgesia and amnesia while protective airway reflexes, spontaneous respirations and cardiopulmonary stability are maintained.

February 9, 2018

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Moderate sedation and analgesia (formerly called conscious sedation) refers to a drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands, alone or accompanied by light tactile stimulation.

February 8, 2018

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Minimal sedation (anxiolysis) is a drug-induced state in which patients respond normally to verbal commands. Although cognitive functions and coordination may be impaired, ventilatory and cardiovascular functions are unaffected.

February 7, 2018

The Working Nurse Podcast | S1, E2

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
The principle side effects of ketamine are dysphoria, vomiting and hypersalivation. Ketamine appears to be effective via the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, a different pathway from opioids, acetaminophen or NSAIDS.

February 6, 2018

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Ketamine is a drug that has typically been used primarily as a dissociative anesthetic for procedural sedation. It is one of the most effective and widely used drugs for procedural anesthesia worldwide.

February 5, 2018

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
For acute pain management, ketorolac is rarely indicated in the patient able to receive oral medications, given that 60  mg of ketorolac administered IM is not clinically superior to 800  mg of oral ibuprofen.

February 4, 2018

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
The major side effects of NSAID analgesic agents are GI bleeding, renal failure, anaphylaxis and platelet dysfunction. Most of these side effects occur in patients who are taking NSAIDs for chronic conditions.

February 3, 2018

Instagram Series | @WorkingNurse

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Nursing Tip of the Day! - Critical Care Nursing

Category: Critical Care Nursing 
Two COX isoenzymes mediate prostaglandin synthesis. COX-1 is present in all cells and plays an important role in homeostatic functions. COX-2 is induced by injury or inflammation and generates prostaglandins.