February 27, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
CMV can cause serious, life-threatening disease in immunocompromised patients. CMV infection occurs in over 40% of solid organ transplant patients during the first 3 months when immunosuppressive therapy is the strongest.

February 26, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
Common problems caused by congenital CMV infection include premature birth, intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, seizures, thrombocytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly or pneumonitis.

February 25, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
The CMV infection is subclinical in most individuals. Some immunocompetent adults will develop a mononucleosis-like syndrome. The illness can last from 2 to 6 weeks and is characterized by fever, fatigue, malaise, myalgia and headache.

February 24, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is harmful in pregnant patients, because it can lead to congenital infection, causing neurologic defects and permanent hearing loss. CMV is present in breast milk, saliva, feces, urine, semen, cervical secretions and blood.

February 23, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
Influenza causes acute respiratory symptoms. This virus is highly contagious and is transmitted through large-particle respiratory droplets. Transmission usually requires close contact between individuals less than 1 meter apart.

February 22, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
It is important to advise patients with infectious mononucleosis to avoid contact sports for at least 3 weeks to avoid splenic rupture. An abdominal ultrasound can assess spleen size to determine when it is safe to return to sports.

February 21, 2020

Why Am I Not Retaining This Information? | Quick Huddle # 5


It took a while to understand why certain things I learned wouldn't stick. I would sit at my desk, reading the same chapters over and over. To then be tested a few days later, and the content be unavailable, or the context wasn't understood properly. Do you know how frustrating that is? Studying, buying the "required" $200 textbook, making the graphs and chart to then FAIL the exam because the information was nowhere to be found when the time came? I can't even! So what does this mean, and how can you avoid this study trap? You are going to have to use this information to reinforce it, to bind it inside your mind. Plain and simple, cut, and dry. You can't merely write pretty notes, put them in a folder, and review it every randomly. Nursing school isn't Instagram, and no one cares if your handwriting is beautiful. How you write your notes, whatever the presentation, the goals are absorption and recognition.

You are going to have to live this information for a week or two before taking your exam. When you read a chapter and think you wholeheartedly understand it inside and out, try to educate a classmate (someone who is learning alongside you). Your counterpart has to be someone with a proper background to be helpful. Meaning, the person has to have some concept of what you are teaching them. The classmate is expected to ask relevant, focused questions such as: If I have this disease, what will happen? What is expected to be seen? What are some complications? What medications will improve or resolve the condition? What are some expected side effects? You are going to educate someone with medical knowledge. Your counterpart will have enough awareness to know if you are wrong or lack proper understanding. This active learning tactic will help in the absorption and recognition of key course concepts. Your peer must be able to provide criticism, and you must be open to accepting, or this isn't going to work. You can't assume you got it 100% because you read it. Reading isn't active learning, and reading does reinforce the content. You must interact with the content on some level, engaging on various levels.

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
Infectious mononucleosis typically has a self-limiting course. The treatment is supportive care with rest, antipyretics and analgesia. Glucocorticoids have been used to decrease the severity of symptoms.

February 20, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
The Epstein-Barr virus in young children is usually asymptomatic or presents as pharyngitis. Adolescents and young adults tend to have the classic infectious mononucleosis (fever, exudative pharyngitis, lymphadenopathy and fatigue).

February 19, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
Parotitis, either unilateral or bilateral, is the hallmark of the mumps, occurring in over 95% of symptomatic patients. The other salivary glands are not as commonly affected. The symptoms usually begin with fever, malaise and headache.

February 18, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
Mumps is spread via infected respiratory secretions that enter a susceptible respiratory tract. Infected patients are most contagious 1 to 2 days before onset of disease but can be contagious as early as 7 days before symptoms.

February 17, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
Tetanus toxoid is an inactivated form of tetanospasmin. Vaccination confers protective antibody levels in nearly 100% of people who receive three doses. Immunity wanes between 5 and 10 years after completion of the series.

February 16, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
Neonatal tetanus is generalized tetanus of the newborn and occurs almost exclusively in developing countries where maternal immunization is inadequate and contaminated material is used to cut and dress umbilical cords.

February 15, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
As generalized tetanus progresses, generalized uncontrollable muscle spasms occur spontaneously or as a result of minor stimuli, such as touch or noise. Spasms can cause vertebral and long bone fractures and tendon rupture.

February 14, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Infectious Diseases

Category: Infectious Diseases 
Generalized tetanus results in spasms of agonist and antagonist muscle groups throughout the body. The classic initial presenting symptom is trismus or “lockjaw,” caused by masseter muscle spasm and is present in 50% to 75% of patients.