October 24, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Infectious mononucleosis, caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), can lead to mucosal edema and an exudative pharyngitis. Uncommonly, massive tonsillar enlargement can occur and create upper airway distress.

October 23, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Peritonsillar abscess (PTA) is the most common deep neck infection and usually occurs in older children and teenagers. Drooling and a muffled, hot potato voice can occur, but severe respiratory distress is unusual.

October 22, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
With micrognathia, an abnormally small mandible posteriorly displaces the normal-sized tongue (Pierre-Robin and Treacher-Collins syndromes). Obstructive symptoms typically worsen when supine.

October 21, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Macroglossia, an abnormally large tongue that protrudes posteriorly into the hypopharynx, is associated with conditions such as Down syndrome, glycogen storage disease and congenital hypothyroidism.

October 20, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing  
Bilateral choanal atresia is a life-threatening emergency that must be identified early because neonates become acutely distressed and cyanotic at birth. Immediate airway management with oral airway is crucial.

October 19, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Stridor is the classic sound associated with upper airway obstruction. Stridor is described by timing in the respiratory cycle (inspiratory, expiratory, biphasic) and quality (coarse or high-pitched).

October 18, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Stridor is a harsh vibratory sound of variable pitch caused by partial airway obstruction or collapse and the resultant turbulent airflow through some portion of the airway, from the nose to the trachea.

October 17, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Febrile children with sickle cell disease are at particular risk for overwhelming infection. In fact, infection is the most common cause of sickle cell-related death, occurring in up to 40% of patients with sickle cell disease who die.

October 16, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Children with suspected Kawasaki disease should be hospitalized and receive therapy with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) and aspirin. Pediatric cardiology consultation for echocardiography is also indicated.

October 15, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Kawasaki disease is one of the most common vasculitides in childhood and should be considered in any infant or child with prolonged fever (> 4 days). The main complication of Kawasaki disease is the development of coronary artery aneurysms.

October 14, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
The differential diagnoses for fever and petechiae include disseminated intravascular coagulation, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, pneumococcal bacteremia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and leukemia.

October 13, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Fever can also be a presenting sign of autoimmune diseases, such as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis or Kawasaki disease. Central nervous system lesions such as brain tumors also can infrequently be manifested with fever.

October 12, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Most viral illnesses are benign and self-limited, but infection with measles, herpes simplex virus (HSV), or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), can lead to significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in the first month of life.

October 11, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
The majority of pediatric fever is due to infections, and most infections are attributable to a viral source. Upper respiratory infections, viral gastroenteritis, bronchiolitis, infectious mononucleosis and varicella are all known causes of fever.

October 10, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
Fever is defined as an elevation in body temperature equal to or > 100.4° F. The most reliable method to measure temperature is rectal and is the preferred method of measurement in high-risk groups, such as infants 0 to 3 months old.