September 22, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing 
Hypothermia increases metabolic demand and oxygen consumption, which can render effective resuscitation efforts futile. To prevent this, all newborns should be dried immediately on delivery and placed under a radiant heat source.

September 21, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing 
In Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS), there is profound micrognathia, resulting in glossoptosis (retraction or downward displacement of the tongue) and cleft palate. Therefore, PRS confers a high risk for significant upper airway obstruction.

September 20, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing 
Because newborns are obligate nose breathers, bilateral choanal atresia causes severe respiratory distress. Choanal atresia can be rapidly diagnosed by the inability to pass a catheter through either naris into the posterior oropharynx.

September 19, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing 
Infants with myelomeningocele should never be placed supine but instead, be placed prone or on the side to avoid pressure on the defect. Resuscitation should proceed from this modified position.

September 18, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing 
In addition to pulmonary hypoplasia, neonates with diaphragmatic hernias have exquisitely reactive pulmonary vascular beds, predisposing them to potentially fatal pulmonary vasospasm in the immediate and late postnatal period.

September 17, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing 
Maternal opioid administration or antenatal drug abuse should be considered in any newborn with isolated respiratory depression that persists, despite a seemingly successful initial resuscitation.

September 16, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing 
Maternal infection (chorioamnionitis) is a particularly common trigger for premature delivery. Premature infants are themselves more susceptible to infection. Therefore, IV antibiotics should be administered.

September 15, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing 
Meconium-stained amniotic fluid (MSAF) indicates potentially significant newborn stress prior to delivery. Aspiration of meconium and its consequences can be avoided, or at least significantly limited, by rapid intervention.

September 14, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing 
Hypoglycemia may be a response to other factors, including respiratory illness, hypothermia, asphyxia and sepsis. Hypoglycemia can be asymptomatic or may cause symptoms including respiratory distress, lethargy, seizures and acidosis.

September 13, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing 
Poor glycogen stores, coupled with immature hepatic enzymes, place the normal newborn at increased risk for hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is common in premature and small-for-gestational-age newborns, as well as those born to diabetic mothers.

September 12, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing 
Drying and warming the newborn are vital to initial resuscitation because the newborn’s inability to maintain normothermia has dire consequences. Newborns cannot generate heat by shivering and cannot retain heat due to low fat stores.

September 11, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing 
Bradycardia in the newborn (HR < 100 beats/min) reflects inadequate ventilation and oxygenation. As such, bradycardia is a major indicator of hypoxia. Simple stimulation is required to stimulate ventilation and reverse bradycardia.

September 10, 2020

5 Study Tips To Studying Smarter, Not Harder


Note: I was compensated for my review of this product / #Sponsored 

Studying can be an overwhelming concept. Between notebooks, highlighters, audiobooks, and group sessions… studying can be exhausting even before you start. There is so much riding on your ability to understand complex processes, with each exam testing your comprehension of the course content. I get it, stressful much?! But I'm going to give you five tips that will help you understand complex concepts and create an environment that will allow you to understand the presented material. 

Start With Why. 
When I sit down to study any disease process, I focus on one word. Why. Why is this happening? I remember my husband resting after his CABG surgery. The nurse practitioner walked in for morning grand-rounds and I asked her a very layered question of “Why did this happen?” She sat down and went over coronary blood flow, his occlusions, physical presentations related to said occlusions, and the subsequent events. After she answered the why component, everything else fell into place for me. I no longer had to ask about statins or how inflammation and diabetes affected his cardiac tissue. It was a continuum and revolved around understanding the disease process in its entirety, rather than lists of information without links or connections. The why is a simple phrase, but it comes with layers and layers of understanding. 

As a person who is still in school, answering why has helped me to pass exams and grow as a nurse. For example, everyone knows what tachycardia is but do you know why it occurs, in relation to hypovolemia? Yes, it is an elevation in heart rate but why is the heart responding in this manner? What told the body to react in this fashion? Well, tachycardia is a compensatory mechanism the body uses to maintain cardiac output when stroke volume is low. Once you understand the compensatory mechanisms of the body, you will then understand the why in many disease processes. When a patient has a gunshot wound and is losing blood, tachycardia occurs because the body is attempting to assist in maintaining cardiac output in a time of crisis. These concepts aren't concrete. What other ways does the body try to assist itself? The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is one. Don't focus on lists and random facts, focus on understanding how our body truly functions and maintains itself. 

Do Not Take Shortcuts. 
Stop with the shortcuts and dedicate yourself to the study plan. You might have a crappy instructor, you might be swamped at work, but the course content is important. It is there so you understand and build on. You can't go backward. Focusing on statin drug names and cholesterol levels are pointless if you have no idea where hyperlipidemia stems from. The human body is a complex machine, but this isn't rocket science. Stop shortchanging yourself and sit down and dig deep. Once you have that level of understanding, you rinse and repeat. Meaning, use your foundations to understand the disease processes, rather than being able to ramble off signs and symptoms with no real understanding of why they are happening in the first place. In the end, you must study with intention and not merely go through the motions. Be smart with your time and use it wisely. We all know those students, the students that can list all the beta-blockers with their generic and brand names. They know all the labels backward and forwards, but they lack understanding of when a beta-blocker would be administered (hypertension, tachycardia) or what side effects could occur (hypoglycemia). Data is meaningless with information links. List, graphs, charts… they mean nothing if you can apply the information in the proper settings. 

Reinforce & Reading.
When studying, try to link things together like a chain and begin with answering why. I have many books, but I get most of my why questions answered from pathophysiology textbooks. They aren't the most exciting reads, but boy do things click after reading them. Also, stop looking for multiple sources of information (initially) and start with the required reading in your course. Too often, students will YouTube something rather than reading the required course material. You'd be surprised how many students will be failing, and I'll ask them if they've done the necessary reading and they say no. No reading, no full grasp of the content and you are surprised you are having issues? Supplemental material is excellent, but it's supplemental and based on your full understanding of basic fundamentals. If you don't have those fundamentals, you will be lost. Listen, I'm on YouTube, I appreciate and am honored by people watching my videos, BUT I'm not you. I'm not in your course, and I'm not your teacher. Do the required reading, then come on over if you have additional questions. Don't blow off reading though. It unlocks things you could otherwise be missing. I'll skim a chapter here or there, YouTube for hours and my professor brings up something I ignored when reading and BAM, it all clicks! I get it, YouTube is exciting and you can turn it on and do other things. But some topics require your undivided attention initially. 

Still Don’t Understand. 
Speaking of reinforcement, check out additional sources other than YouTube such as Picmonic. Sometimes I need more than a conversational video, more than someone talking - I need an interactive experience. Cheat sheets and stories are awesome resources and Picmonic is a great platform that includes these options and much more. One feature Picmonic offers is the education mode. The style is viewing-based and has various topics from basic ECG to electrolytes made easy. The point of the education mode is to take a complex, distracting topic and break the content down, so you can absorb and understand the material. You ever purchase a book and read the first few pages and realized it doesn't 'speak' to you? The information is there, but there is a disconnect. There is no one size fits all regarding education. You have to find what works for you, and the education mode is for learners who enjoy a presentation of information and want a passive learning experience. It's great because you can write notes, pause the video and rewind. You can even replay the video over and over. The education goes at your pace and is always available to you. I saw a video on electrolytes and after watching it for the third time, I truly understood the intricate details of electrolyte imbalances. 

Your Environment Matters.
Now, we’ve covered what you need to focus on, how you need to focus and what resources you can use, it is now time to men the environmental factors, in terms of stress. As I stated before, studying is stressful but take each assignment and each chapter one spoonful at a time. Don’t focus on the act of studying, focus on maturing your knowledge base. Each reading assignment, each interactive learning experience is how you grow as a student. Find a space and place to make this process a seamless, polite one. Don’t start studying, then check in on Instagram, then Tic Tok, then check your inbox. Put your phone away and be present in your study experience. Put in some music (if this assist you in focusing), get your favorite drink or snack and set a tone for calm and concentration. There are many distractions and roads that will lead you to ignore knowledge procurement. In the end, it remains up to you to invest in yourself and respect yourself enough to pass that class, pass that exam the first time around.

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Maternal Neonatal Nursing

Category: Maternal Neonatal Nursing 
It can take 10 minutes for blood oxygen saturation to reach normal extrauterine levels. Pulse oximetry may assist in determining hypoxemia, but it may take several minutes for a reliable waveform to be achieved.

September 9, 2020

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Pediatric Nursing

Category: Pediatric Nursing 
The successful transition from fetal to extrauterine life requires (1) removal of fluid from alveoli to allow ventilation; (2) lung expansion and establishment of functional residual capacity and (3) redistribution of cardiac output to provide lung perfusion.