October 21, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
When glucose is not transported into the cells because of a lack of food intake or lack of insulin, the body perceives a fasting state and releases glucagon, attempting to provide the glucose necessary for brain function.

October 20, 2019

Try Not To Take Small Annoyances At Work Personally | Quick Huddle # 2


I've seen many nurses being outright furious at the little things throughout their shift - throwing things, screaming, making a complete scene. If it isn't the pharmacy, it's someone hitting their call light 900 times because they can't find their phone charger, or even a provider calling you while you're in the bathroom. I understand. I have been there. And yes, it can be quite annoying. Sometimes, the entire shift is filled with nothing but stressful encounters. But, you can't let these isolated events alter your mindset. In the past, I found myself in an annoyance blackhole. And as the hours passed, the tension would build and build until I lost it on someone over something completely minor. As I've come to understand nursing is generally chaotic, I've learned to manage the annoyances appropriately and professionally.

Now when these same situations occur, I redirect myself. Is this one thing really that serious? Or is being on my feet for 10 hours straight the real issue? Is this an exhaustion rage, or is this an issue regarding patient safety? I try to find the real reason why I'm upset first and go from there. I also wear a focus token, an item that redirects me towards my professional purpose, which is to help people. Yeah, the pharmacy lost my patient's medication. Yes, that's annoying, but I need to follow-up for my patient's sake. My current token is a little, thin red bracelet. If I'm not wearing it, I draw a star on my report sheet, and when I'm stressed, I look at it. The goal is to have a focus point to redirect, process, and defuse your frustration while you process acute, current issues at work. Being annoyed doesn't mean you don't care, you actually care a lot. People who don't care aren't bothered by small or large things, because they have no vested interest in the job at all. Being annoyed isn't against the professional code, but lashing out and being unprofessional is. There is a difference. I'm breathing on my own, I have use of all my extremities, and my family is healthy and safe. I remind myself of this often during work. Even when it is "bad," it is not bad-bad. You are more appreciated than you will ever know. Find your focus points, and keep being awesome.

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Insulin is secreted from the beta cells of the pancreatic islets into the hepatic portal circulation. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake, storage, and use by other insulin-sensitive tissues such as fat and muscle.

October 19, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Glucose regulatory hormones include insulin, glucagon, epinephrine, cortisol and growth hormone. Insulin is the main glucose-lowering hormone. Insulin suppresses endogenous glucose production and stimulates glucose use.

October 18, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Certain amino acids induce insulin release and even cause hypoglycemia in some patients. Sulfonylurea oral hypoglycemic agents work, in part, by stimulating the release of insulin from the pancreas.

October 17, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Insulin receptors on the beta cells of the pancreas sense elevations in the blood glucose concentration and trigger insulin release into the blood. Oddly enough, glucose taken by mouth causes more insulin release than parenteral glucose.

October 16, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Glucose is derived from three sources - intestinal absorption from diet, breakdown of glycogen (glycogenolysis) and the formation of glucose from precursors (gluconeogenesis), including lactate, pyruvate, amino acids and glycerol.

October 15, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Because plasma glucose is the predominant metabolic fuel used by the central nervous system (CNS), maintenance of the plasma glucose concentration is critical to survival. Brief hypoglycemia can cause profound CNS dysfunction.

October 13, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine disease. Acute complications include hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS).

October 12, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Mild to moderate hypophosphatemia is usually asymptomatic. Because phosphate is an essential component of adenosine triphosphate, hypophosphatemia can affect a variety of organ systems and a wide variety of symptoms.

October 11, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Patients most likely to have hypophosphatemia are those who present with alcohol withdrawal, sepsis and patients with DKA or alcohol ketoacidosis in whom reintroduction of insulin and glucose causes phosphate uptake into cells.

October 10, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Acute hypophosphatemia is most commonly due to a rapid intracellular shift. Hyperventilation, glucose, insulin, volume expansion, and resolving acidosis can lead to hypophosphatemia by rapid intracellular shift.