December 14, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Diabetic patients are more susceptible to complications of infections because of their inability to limit microbial invasion with effective polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes. They have an increased incidence of extremity infections.

December 13, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Sensory neuropathy, ischemia and infection are the principal contributors to diabetic foot disease. Loss of sensation leads to pressure necrosis from poorly fitting footwear and small wounds going unnoticed.

December 12, 2019

My Top Two Favorite Study Habits


#1 - Keep It Small 

So many times, I've studied intending to learn an entire concept in a short period of time. We all have life going on, and most of the time, we don't have weeks and weeks to learn something. In my undergraduate and graduate nursing programs, I had exams every other week. The problem is that you will not retain all the content you have read. Your brain doesn't work that way (well, mine doesn't anyway). You don't dump a large amount of information into it, and it all sticks. Usually, only a few concepts stick with the rest of the data being vaguely remembered.

Instead of trying to learn everything, I pick an element and focus on that for a specific time frame. Keep your study sessions small and study with intention. Instead of trying to learn about every type of shock, pick one type, and focus on that section. This will allow your brain time to soak up the information and catalog it in your mind. Take a break and then hit the next topic. I know you don't have a lot of time to study, but jamming it all into one session won't do you any good. Yes, you will go through the content, but I doubt you remember all you need to know.

Suggestion: 15 to 20 mins per topic, with a 2-minute break in between. Don't try to start a Netflix movie or check your Instagram, haha. Go to the bathroom, stretch, get a snack, and get back to it.

#2 - Test Your Knowledge 

Pretend you are giving discharge education to a patient about a particular disease process. If you can articulate and explain the essential aspects to the other person successfully, you have retained the information. It's a form of self-testing in verbal form. So many times, I've read something, and the next day I wasn't able to articulate what I read. This lack of connection was due to me not needing to recall the information. Once you have presented the content, it's get buried deep down, in my opinion. What you are doing here is reinforcing newly acquired information. This action will help you retain more of your study content.

When you are tested, you usually aren't tested on which receptors activate which cells. Most nursing exams focus more on nursing care and disease processes. You can test your understanding of these concepts by educating a roommate or significant other (you could even FaceTime a classmate). Once you are done, ask the 'patient' if he or she understood what you said and if they had any follow-up questions. This follow-up also helps you to catch any confusing or mismatched messages in your presentation.

When I practice with my husband, I give him my textbook afterward. I want him to assess what he found to be essential and let me know what I missed. Your counterpart doesn't need to have a medical background. If they can read, you're good. The point here is to allow for feedback while learning at the same time. If I can discuss cardiogenic shock with my husband over eating spaghetti, it stays with me. The entire experience is reinforced in a different aspect of my mind.

Suggestion:  Have a shy 'patient'? Here are some questions you can put on index cards - What does this disease disrupt? What are the side effects? What does this do exactly? Why does this happen? Why do I need this? Why is this important? 
*The what and whys will test your knowledge best

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Diabetes is one of the leading causes of adult blindness in the United States. Around 11% to 18% of all diabetic patients have treatable diabetic retinopathy, ranging from mild to severe, and manifested in many forms.

December 11, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Diabetic patients have an increased incidence of myocardial infarctions and congestive heart failure. Peripheral vascular disease is noted clinically by claudication, nonhealing ulcers, gangrene and impotence.

December 10, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Diabetes is associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis and thromboembolic complications, which are a major cause of morbidity. Atherosclerotic lesions are widespread, causing symptoms in many organs.

December 9, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) represents a syndrome of acute diabetic decompensation characterized by marked hyperglycemia, hyperosmolarity, dehydration and decreased mental function that may progress to frank coma.

December 8, 2019

How To Remain Focused In A New Job | Quick Huddle # 3


As a person who has recently started a new job, I've had to practice remaining focused while within the learning process. The first question you want to ask yourself is, how will I create value? When you start a new job, things can be overwhelming - learning new processes, job objections, performance expectations, challenges, etc. But don't overlook your value. When you applied to this position, what value did you see contributing to your organization? In order to remain focused, you must know what your profession plans and goals will be for the days and years to come. This is a new job, but don't forget they hired you because they saw something they wanted to cultivate. Lean into it.

The next question to ask yourself is, what support is critical? When starting a new job, you are immediately aware of what you need and when. You might not be an expert, but you know what you need to perform your job duties. Once you know what you need, focus on obtained or retaining said support systems. Nothing is more frustrating than working without the supplies you need to be successful. We have all been there, and lack of support always disengages team members. Don't wait for this to happen. Find out what you need and focus on obtaining or retaining those options. Budget and logistics will play a role in you procuring these items, but the goal is to be proactive and honest, and not bitter and passive in what you need to be successful at your new job.

Lastly, ask yourself what skills do you need? You have the job! But what will you need to retain the position? What skills will you need to be a quality team member? These are complicated questions, with no one-word answer. If needed, seek advice from senior staff or colleagues. The goal is to find out what others recommend you focus on or study up in regards to your new job. Learning is stressful enough. Having a road map will help you stay on the right track. It's very humbling and will allow you the ability to see what others deem important or crucial for your position. Unlike you, these individuals have the experience and will be able to provide you with guidance on where to begin.

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
In DKA, because the half-life of regular insulin is 3-10 minutes, insulin should be administered IV. When the blood glucose has dropped to 250 mg/dL, adding dextrose to the IV fluids reduces the risk of hypoglycemia and cerebral edema.

December 6, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
The serum sodium level is often misleading in DKA. It is often low in the presence of dehydration. When hyperglycemia is marked, water flows from the cells into the vessels to decrease the osmolar gradient, thereby creating dilutional hyponatremia

December 5, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Metabolic acidosis, in DKA, with an anion gap is primarily the result of elevated plasma levels of acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate, although lactate, FFAs, phosphates, volume depletion and several medications can also contribute.

December 4, 2019

Nursing Tip of the Day! - Fundamentals

Category: Fundamentals 
Typical findings of DKA include tachypnea with Kussmaul’s breathing, tachycardia, frank hypotension or orthostatic blood pressure changes, odor of acetone on the breath and signs of dehydration.